Who’s Going to Pick the Fruit and Vegetables?/Quien Cosechará la Fruta y las Verduras

Former "bracero" with his wife at home in Zacatecas/"Bracero" en el pasado con su esposa en su casa de Zacatecas

Former “bracero” with his wife at home in Zacatecas/”Bracero” en el pasado con su esposa en su casa de Zacatecas

 

“There is a definite need for a source of imported labor during the harvest peaks.”

-R.E. Browne, Southern California Farmers Association / Asociación de Agricultores del Sur de California, 1950

Is this the best way we can grow our big orchards?
Is this the best way we can grow our good fruit?
– Woody Guthrie in his poem and song “Deportee” , 1949

Since the boom in productivity of U.S. agriculture over one hundred years ago, who will cultivate the fields and pick the fruit and vegetables has remained a challenging question.  Until the Chinese Exclusion Act of the early 1920’s the Chinese migrants led the way.  Japanese and Mexican immigrants took their place until the outbreak of WW II when an agreement between

WWII poster promoting the Bracero Program

WWII poster promoting the Bracero Program

the U.S. and Mexican governments created the “bracero program”.

The fact that Mexican and Mexican-American workers are counted on by  U.S. fruit and vegetable farmers today is in large part due to the bracero program.   Between 1942 and 1964 4.5 million Mexicans signed contracts to work for a limited time in fields in the U.S.. During WWII, Mexican “braceros” (from the Spanish “brazos” for arms) were, in the words of President Roosevelt, “contributing with their skill and their labor to the production of vitally needed food”.   Today, farm workers in California’s San Joaquin Valley, sometimes called the “breadbasket for the world”, are almost entirely Mexican and Mexican-American.

Providing labor for U.S. farmers when most needed and helping the worker to return home to Mexico was the design of the “bracero” program.  It took advantage of the low wages paid on the other side of the U.S.-Mexico border, the longest border in the world between a rich nation and a poor nation.

We talked recently with a former “bracero” who returned to the U.S. eleven or twelve times between 1952 and 1963.  Candelario Espino Rodriguez, the 86 year old father of San Luis Potosi Disciples pastor Rogelio Espino Flores welcomed us to his adobe home on a large lot in Ojo Caliente, Zacatecas. It is the same home he left for three month contracts to work for cotton farmers in Texas and to pick tomatoes in the Imperial Valley of California.  The only complaint he shared with us was that the last meal of the day was served at 4:30 pm. (rather than the traditional hour of 9 pm or later for the Mexican “cena”)  Our friend Rogelio says his father never mentioned the “bracero” experience except to counsel his children never to head “to the other side” in search of higher pay.

Several developments led to repeal of the law governing the “bracero” program in 1964.  Some horrific accidents involving “braceros” drew attention to widespread mistreatment of the mostly

The Farmworkers' Union successfully organized opposition to use of the "short handled hoe"/ "El cortito" azodón fue prohibido gracias a los esfuerzos de la Union de Campesinos en los 80's.

The Farmworkers’ Union successfully organized opposition to use of the “short handled hoe”/ “El cortito” azodón fue prohibido gracias a los esfuerzos de la Union de Campesinos en los 80’s.

non-English speaking Mexican workers, including frequent disputes over pay and discrimination within some of the farming communities.  From its founding in 1962, the United Farmworkers Union led by Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta opposed the importing of labor from Mexico.  In the view of UFW leaders, contracted labor from Mexico kept farmworker wages below the U.S. poverty level and made the worker more vulnerable to inhumane work conditions.

Some of the UFW’s early members first entered the U.S. as “braceros” and now can boast of children with a PhD.  Their stories and those of other “ex-braceros” were collected by the Smithsonian’s “Bracero Archive Project”.  They resemble stories of immigrants from other lands with a distinctive and very important twist: their former homeland lies  a short trip away, across a border that changed eight times in the first hundred years of the U.S. as a nation.  How these Mexican immigrants shaped a new identity is one of the fascinating sides of the stories told by these elders whose descendants will make up the largest ethnic group in California and other U.S. states by the middle of this century.  Here are two of the captivating stories that can be found at the web site http://braceroarchive.org/

MY PAPA CAME TO THE US AS A BRACERO IN THE EARLY 1940’S FROM A SMALL VILLAGE IN MICHOCHAN, MEXICO…HE WAS AN ORPHAN AND BEGAN WORKING AS A YOUNG BOY IN MEXICO…HIS AUNT RAISED HIM…HE ONLY HAD A 3RD GRADE EDUCATION…BUT HE COULD READ AND WRITE…WHEN HE WAS A YOUNG MAN…THE VILLAGE HAD BEEN BULLETED WITH FLIERS ABOUT WORK IN THE US…HE TOLD HIS AUNT HE WAS GOING TO FIND OUT …HE NEVER RETURNED HOME. THEY SAW A STRONG YOUNG MAN AND BOARDED HIM ON THE TRAIN WITH OTHERS AND HE

Weighing cotton/Pesando algodón

Weighing cotton/Pesando algodón

BEGAN WORKING IN THE FIELDS OF SO. MONTEREY COUNTY. HE TOILED IN THE FIELDS WITH NO WATER, LITTLE FOOD AND OFTEN FILLED WITH MAGGETS…HE TOLD THE WORKERS NOT TO EAT THE FOOD…HE BECAME AN ADVOCATE FOR DECENT HUMAN CONDITIONS FOR THE BRACEROS…WHAT LITTLE MONEY HE MADE SENT IT BACK TO MEXICO. IN THE LATE 1940’S HE SETTLED IN SAN JUAN BAUTISTA, CA…HE WORKED AS COOK IN BOARDING HOUSE FOR BRACEROS BY NOW AND MET HIS WIFE, CARMEN MURO…THEY WOULD HAVE 8 CHILDREN…MANY OF HAVE RECEIVED A COLLEGE DEGREE, ONE A MASTER’S DEGREE…AND IN 2008 HE PASSED AWAY AT THE AGE OF 95…STILL ABLE TO TELL HIS STORIES OF HIS JOURNEY INTO THE US. AT THE AGE OF OF 82 YEARS OLD HE BECAME A US CITIZEN…REALIZING HE NEVER GOING TO RETURN HOME TO MEXICO.

Creator

CONSUELO ESPINOSA

It was not until 1953, at age 19, he finally entered the Bracero Program. Assigned to work in Arizona, his hard labor paid off. He found favor with his employers. Out of 160 braceros, 3 were chosen as supervisors to apply for legal residency. Their aplication fees were fully paid by his employer. They were the lucky ones. The less fortunate braceros were subjected to racism, segregation, physical abuse, and sometimes death.

This bracero is my father. He married in 1968 and migrated to the beautiful Salinas Valley, where he continued his work in farm labor and still takes pride in being a busy, hard working man. In 2002, 49 years later after entering this country, my father became a US Citizen! I was so proud of him.

Today, he sits and watches how the country which once desperately needed him, at times still continues to despise and mistreat Mexican laborers.

Creator

Mary Vargas

The Smithsonian’s Bracero History Archive and its article “Bittersweet Harvest: the Bracero Program 1942-1964” were primary resources in writing this 

******************                             ******************

Gracias a Revda. Lisania Sustaita Martinez por su ayuda en la traducción del blog.

“Hay una necesidad clara de una fuente de mano de obra importada durante los picos de la cosecha”.
– R.E. Browne, Asociación de Agricultores del Sur de California, 1950

¿Es esto el mejor modo
en que podemos cultivar
nuestros grandes huertos?
¿Es este el mejor modo
para cultivar nuestra buena fruta?
– Woody Guthrie en su poema y canción “Deportée”, 1949

Después del aumento considerable en la productividad de la agricultura estadounidense hace más de cien años, “¿quien cultivará los campos y quien cosechará la fruta y verduras?” ha permanecido como una pregunta provocativa.

Hasta el Acto de Exclusión de los Chinos de principios de los años 1920 los emigrantes chinos dominaron en los campos del país. Los inmigrantes japoneses y mexicanos tomaron su lugar hasta el brote de la Segunda Guerra Mundial cuando un acuerdo entre los gobiernos estadounidenses y mexicanos creó el “programa bracero”.

El hecho que los trabajadores mexicanos y mexicano-americanos sean los cultivadores y

U.S. Govt. issued card on completion of the bracero contract reads, "in appreciation of the labor rendered for the increased food and fiber required for the war effort" - in 1951!/ Tarjeta officiale del gobierno de los EEUU dice, "en appreciation de la contribución prestada al aumento del alimento y fibra necessarios para el esfuerzo de defensa de la nación". - en el año 1951!

U.S. Govt. issued card on completion of the bracero contract reads, “in appreciation of the labor rendered for the increased food and fiber required for the war effort” – in 1951!/ Tarjeta officiale del gobierno de los EEUU dice, “en appreciation de la contribución prestada al aumento del alimento y fibra necessarios para el esfuerzo de defensa de la nación”. – en el año 1951!

cosechadores de la fruta y las verduras estadounidenses hoy es en gran parte debido al programa bracero. Entre 1942 y 1964, 4.5 millones de mexicanos firmaron contratos para trabajar por un tiempo limitado en los campos del norte. Durante la segunda guerra mundial, “braceros” mexicanos, en las palabras del presidente Roosevelt, “contribuyen con su habilidad y su trabajo a la producción de la comida sumamente necesaria”. Hoy, los labradores en el Valle de San Joaquín de California, a veces llamado la “la panera del mundo”, son casi completamente mexicanos y mexicano-americanos.

El suministro del trabajo para agricultores estadounidenses cuando sea lo más necesario y la ayuda al obrero para volver a casa a México era el diseño del programa “bracero”. Aprovechó los salarios mal pagados al otro lado de la frontera de Estados-Unidos-México, la más larga en el mundo entre una nación rica y una nación pobre.

Hablamos recientemente con un antiguo “bracero” quien volvió a los Estados Unidos once o doce veces entre 1952 y 1963. Candelario Espino Rodriguez, el padre de 86 años del pastor de los Discípulos de Cristo de San Luis Potosí Rogelio Espino Flores, nos dió la bienvenida a su casa de adobe sobre un gran terreno en Ojo Caliente, Zacatecas. Es la misma casa que dejó por un contrato de tres meses para trabajar para agricultores de algodón en Texas y piscar tomates en el Valle Imperial de California. Su hijo, nuestro amigo Rogelio, dice que su padre nunca mencionó su experiencia de “bracero” excepto para aconsejar a sus hijos a nunca dirigirse “al otro lado” en busca de un pago más alto.

Varios acontecimientos condujeron a la abrogación de la ley que gobierna el programa “bracero” en 1964. Algunos accidentes horrorosos en que murieron “braceros” llamaron la atención hacia el maltrato sufrido por los trabajadores mexicanos generalmente quienes no hablaban inglés, incluso disputas frecuentes de paga y discriminación dentro de las comunidades en donde cultivaban la tierra. Desdé su fundación en 1962, la Unión de Campesinos conducida por Cesar Chavez y Dolores Huerta se opuso a la importación de mano de obra de México. En la visión de los líderes de la UFC, el trabajo contratado de México guardó salarios del labrador debajo del nivel de pobreza estadounidense e hizó al obrero más vulnerable a condiciones de trabajo inhumanas.

Algunos miembros al comienzo de la UFC entraron en los Estados Unidos como “braceros” y ahora se pueden jactar de hijos con doctorados. Sus historias y aquellas de otros “ex-braceros” fueron recogidos por el “Proyecto del Archivo de Bracero”. Se parecen a historias de inmigrantes de otros países a los EEUU con esta diferencia distintiva y muy importante: su patria de procedencia está cruzando una frontera que cambió ocho veces en los primeros cientos años de los Estados Unidos como una nación.

Cómo estos inmigrantes mexicanos formaron una nueva identidad, es uno de los aspectos fascinantes de las historias contadas por estos mayores cuyos descendientes representarán al grupo étnico más grande en California y otros estados estadounidenses en poco tiempo. Aquí están dos de las historias cautivadoras que se pueden encontrar en el sitio web http://braceroarchive.org/

MI PAPÁ VINO A LOS EE.UU COMO UN BRACERO A PRINCIPIOS DE LOS AÑOS 1940 DE UN PEQUEÑO PUEBLO EN MICHOCHAN, MÉXICO… ERA UN HUÉRFANO Y COMENZÓ A TRABAJAR COMO UN MUCHACHO JOVEN EN MÉXICO… SU TÍA LE CRIÓ… SÓLO TENÍA UNA EDUCACIÓN DEL 3ER GRADO… PERO PODÍA LEER Y ESCRIBIR… CUANDO ERA UN JOVEN… EL PUEBLO HABÍA SIDO EL BLANCO DE MUCHA  PEOPAGANDA SOBRE EL TRABAJO EN LOS EE.UU… DIJO A SU TÍA QUE IBA A AVERIGUARLO… NUNCA VOLVIÓ A CASA. VIERON A UN JOVEN FUERTE Y LE ALOJARON EN EL TREN CON OTROS Y COMENZÓ A TRABAJAR EN LOS CAMPOS DEL CONDADO DE MONTEREY. TRABAJÓ DURO EN LOS CAMPOS SIN AGUA, POCA COMIDA Y A MENUDO SE LLENABA DE PARÁSITOS… INDICÓ A LOS TRABAJADORES NO COMER LA COMIDA… SE HIZO UN INTERCESOR PARA CONDICIONES HUMANAS DECENTES PARA LOS BRACEROS… LO POCO DE DINERO QUE HACÍA LO ENVIABA A MÉXICO. A FINALES DE LOS AÑOS 1940 SE INSTALÓ EN SAN JUAN BAUTISTA, CALIFORNIA… TRABAJÓ COMO COCINERO EN LA PENSIÓN PARA BRACEROS Y ALLÍ ENCONTRÓ A SU ESPOSA, CARMEN MURO… TENDRÍAN 8 NIÑOS. .. MUCHOS DE ELLOS HAN RECIBIDO UN TÍTULO UNIVERSITARIO, UN TÍTULO DE MAESTRÍA… Y EN 2008 FALLECIÓ A la edad de 95 años TODAVÍA CAPAZ DE CONTAR SUS HISTORIAS DE SU VIAJE EN LOS EE.UU. A LA EDAD DE 82 AÑOS SE HIZO CIUDADANO estadounidense DANDOSE CUENTA DE QUE NUNCA IBA A VOLVER A SU CASA EN MÉXICO.

ESCRITA POR SU HIJA,
CONSUELO ESPINOSA

“Un Bracero Humilde”
No fue sino hasta 1953, a la edad de 19 años, que finalmente entró en el Programa Bracero. Encomendado a trabajar en Arizona, sus trabajos duros dieron resultado. Encontró gracia delante de sus empleadores. De 160 braceros, 3 se eligieron como supervisores y para solicitar los papeles de residencia permanente. Sus gastos de la aplicación fueron totalmente pagados por su empleador. Eran afortunados. Braceros menos afortunados eran sometidos a racismo, segregación, abuso físico, y a veces muerte.

Este bracero es mi padre. Se casó en 1968 y emigró al Valle de Salinas, un valle muy hermoso, donde siguió su trabajo en granjas y todavía se siente orgulloso de ser un hombre trabajador. ¡En 2002, 49 años después de entrar en este país, mi padre se hizo un Ciudadano estadounidense!

Hoy, se sienta y mira cómo el país que una vez desesperadamente le necesitó, a veces todavía sigue despreciando y maltratando a trabajadores mexicanos.

Escrita por su hija,
Mary Vargas

El Archivo de la Historia Bracero de Smithsonian y su artículo “Bittersweet Harvest: the Bracero Program 1942-1964” eran recursos primarios en la escritura de este blog.

 

 

About erasingborders

The blog title harks back to an ancient Church history document, The Address to the Emperor Diognetus reporting on the lives of third century Christians in Asia Minor: “They live in their native lands but like foreigners…They take part in everything like citizens and endure everything like aliens. Every foreign country is their native land and every native land a foreign country…. They remain on earth but they are citizens of heaven.” Kate Moyer's wedding present to Doug Smith of a dancing jester figure bore the quote, “I like geography best, he said, because your mountains and rivers know the secret. Pay no attention to boundaries.” They dedicate this blog then to helping bring about the day when human beings share the resources of the planet equitably and without borders. Our geography experience features childhoods in the Midwest. Kate lived for over twenty years as an adult in the small town of Neodesha, Kansas while Doug has been an urban dweller all his adult life. She is able to readily identify most crops and keeps a close watch on her partner’s snob tendencies. The Nile Valley of Egypt, for Kate, and the Congo rainforest for Doug have left deep marks on their interior landscapes.

Posted on November 7, 2014, in Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Ing. Hemer E. Sierra S,

    As usual a very comprehensive and in depth blog, congratulations Dough, for such a complete document on what happened in those war days. When two countries have the courage and in deep good wish to tackle together a problem “Good Will” works wonders. Both countries benefited from this ” Brasero Program”, and things went almost smoothed. Thanks Mexico and USA, for showing Good Thinking worked great,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: